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FAQs

Have a question about avocados? Browse our list of Frequently Asked Questions below for answers to common questions.

Frequently Asked Avocado Questions

  • Can you freeze avocados? If so, how?

    Ripe fruit can be stored in the refrigerator uncut for up to three days. To store cut fruit, sprinkle it with lemon or lime juice or white vinegar and place it in an air-tight container in your refrigerator. If refrigerated guacamole turns brown (due to oxidation) during storage, discard the top layer.

    When you have an abundance of fresh avocados, consider freezing them. Pureed avocados freeze very well and can be used in salads, sandwiches and dips.
    1.    Wash, seed and peel the fruit
    2.    Puree the flesh, adding one tablespoon of lemon juice for each two pureed avocados
    3.    Pack the puree into an air-tight container, leaving 1 inch of headspace
    4.    Seal and label the containers
    5.    Freeze and use within four to five months

    For more selecting and handling information, please visit the Selecting and Handling section of our Web site.

  • How much d-mannoheptulose is in a medium avocado?

    While research shows that avocados contain the sugar molecule D-mannoheptulose, we do not have any source of how much is in a serving of avocado.

    Based on the USDA nutrient database, we do know that a 1-oz serving of an avocado contains 2.6 grams of carbohydrate. The current analyses that have been completed on the California fruit do not get into the specific types of sugars in the fruit.
     
    For a complete analysis, you can visit the USDA Web site at http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search

  • I have heard that avocados make a nutritious baby food, is this true?

    While we always recommend following a physician's advice, you are right in that avocados are considered an excellent first food for babies. Learn more about homemade avocado baby food.

  • I love avocados and so do my pets. Are avocados bad for them?

    We recommend that you speak with your veterinarian to get advice on whether it is OK to feed them to your animals or not.

  • I am interested in substituting ‘x’ with avocados. How does ‘x’ compare to avocados?

    Please see the Spread and Dip Nutritional comparison for fresh avocados on the Nutrition section of our Web site.

  • I have heard that the avocado seed contains additional nutrients is this true?

    The California Avocado Commission does not recommend consumption of the “pit” or seed of an avocado. The seed of an avocado contains elements that are not intended for human consumption.

  • I noticed on your site that the folate percentage is different for the Spanish version versus the English version, is this a mistake?

    Regarding your question as to why the Folate percent of daily value requirement is twice as high in Spanish as it is in English, this is based on the Recommended Daily Values (RDV) for U.S. and Spanish nutrition requirements. The U.S. Folate RDV is 400 micrograms per day, established by the Food and Nutrition Board of the National Academy of Sciences. The Spanish RDA is 200 micrograms per day and that figure was set by Food and Nutrition Board of the National Academy of Sciences Spanish counterpart.

    The labels on our Web site are correct, and in compliance with the FDA Guidelines for Nutrition Labeling, the content has been approved by the FDA.

  • What is the Omega content in avocados?

    Based on a single serving of avocado (1/5 medium avocado or 30g), avocados contain the following milligrams of Omega 3, Omega 6 and Omega 9:
    OMEGA 3 = 40mg
    OMEGA 6 = 500mg
    OMEGA 9 = 30mg

    The avocado is virtually the only fruit that has monounsaturated fat (the good fat). This good fat can help boost HDL (good cholesterol) and lower LDL (bad cholesterol), which is especially important for people with diabetes, as they are at greater risk of heart disease.
    Visit the USDA Dietary Guidelines for Americans Web site for more information. http://www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/

  • What are the total carbs and calories in an avocado?

    The total carbohydrates of an avocado (serving size 1/5 medium [30g/1oz]) is 3 grams or 1 percent of the daily value.

    The total calories of an avocado (serving size 1/5 medium [30g/1oz]) is 50 per serving (35 calories from fat).

    Learn more about avocado nutrition information.

  • Are there nutrition differences by variety?

    There are hundreds of avocado selections worldwide, each with their own characteristic shape, size, color, seasonality and other features. Along with the diverse external appearance of the fruit, they may vary internally too in texture, taste, color as well as nutritionally. Approximately 95 percent of avocados sold in the U.S. domestic markets are the Hass variety, which has a well-established nutritional label.
     
    Hass fruit accumulate rich nutty oils as the harvest season progresses, so late season fruit from any growing area may be higher in these oils than earlier season fruit. The nutrition label accounts for these variances.

Avocado

Eating Avocado

  • How can you tell if an avocado is ripe?

    The best way to tell if a California Avocado is ready for immediate use is to gently squeeze the fruit in the palm of your hand (avoid squeezing with your fingertips). Ripe, ready-to-eat fruit will be firm yet will yield to gentle pressure.

    For more selecting and handling information, please visit the Selecting and Handling section of our Web site.

  • Can you freeze avocados? If so, how?

    Ripe fruit can be stored in the refrigerator uncut for up to three days. To store cut fruit, sprinkle it with lemon or lime juice or white vinegar and place it in an air-tight container in your refrigerator. If refrigerated guacamole turns brown (due to oxidation) during storage, discard the top layer.

    When you have an abundance of fresh avocados, consider freezing them. Pureed avocados freeze very well and can be used in salads, sandwiches and dips.
    1.    Wash, seed and peel the fruit
    2.    Puree the flesh, adding one tablespoon of lemon juice for each two pureed avocados
    3.    Pack the puree into an air-tight container, leaving 1 inch of headspace
    4.    Seal and label the containers
    5.    Freeze and use within four to five months

    For more selecting and handling information, please visit the Selecting and Handling section of our Web site.

  • How do I know if my California Avocado is too ripe to eat?

    If the fruit or guacamole has oxidized (turned brown) on the top layer and the underneath is green, simply discard the brown layer. If the fruit is overly soft or the stem end appears to be drying out (shriveled), inspect the fruit carefully and use fruit that is free of brown color or strings. Overly ripe fruit can take on a rancid odor so inspect closely for that as well.

    For more selecting and handling information, please visit the Selecting and Handling section of our Web site.

The Quality of Avocados

  • I can’t seem to buy a good quality avocado. What is going on?

    It is disappointing to hear of your less-than-satisfying experience with your recent avocado purchases. Avocados are available year-round from multiple sources of supply. The peak season for California Avocados is spring through fall. The maturity of avocados from different origins can affect the texture, quality and overall eating experience. If it is California Avocado season and you are experiencing these issues on fruit with a Price Look Up (PLU) sticker that says California on it, please contact us so that we can look into the issue.

    As part of our retail outreach, we provide handling, ripening, storage and display information and materials to retailers to educate them on proper handling for avocados at store-level.

    If you haven’t already, it’s a good practice to make your produce manager aware of any concerns you experience so they can address them.

    If all else fails, consider ordering California Avocados online from one of our growers who are currently offering this service.

  • What are the bumps found on the surface of the skin of my avocado?

    The “bumps” (not the pebbly bumps that are part of the Hass Avocado’s external skin) found on your avocado, or the occurrence of hard, corky or woody “pebbles” in the flesh of Hass avocados is rare. Avocados naturally have a defense mechanism that allows a wound to the skin to be “corked off” resulting in pebble-like nodes in the pulp. The bumps are not harmful.

  • Why does my California Avocado and/or guacamole turn brown? If I keep the seed in with the fruit will that help?

    Oxidation (exposure to air) can cause the fruit of an avocado and/or guacamole to turn brown. By brushing the fruit or guacamole with an acidic agent such as lemon, lime, vinegar or even oranges and placing the avocado or dish in an air-tight container in your refrigerator, you can help delay this process.

    Placing the avocado seed in guacamole may help maintain the color of the guacamole because the seed reduces the amount of surface area that is exposed to air (minimizing oxidization). We recommend covering your guacamole with clear plastic wrap or placing it in an air tight container if you prepare it in advance and want to store it in the refrigerator for a few hours.

  • What happened to the quality of avocados recently?

    Avocados are now available year round due to global sourcing. During periods of transition from one origin to the next, you may experience quality issues due to early season fruit from one area and late season fruit from another. Avocados generally have a Price Look Up (PLU) sticker on them with information on where the fruit is from. Generally speaking California Avocados are in the market from spring through fall.

    If you experience quality issues during the California season on fruit with a California PLU, please let us know so that we may look into the issue. As always, when you experience issues with quality, we suggest you inform your produce department personnel.

  • Why does my avocado have strings or spots?

    Strings or stringy fruit or the thickening of the vascular bundles (fibers that run longitudinally through the fruit) are generally the result of fruit from younger trees or improper storage conditions. Often times the fibers or strings will disappear or become less noticeable as the fruit (and tree) matures.

    Flesh discoloration can occur when the avocado has been exposed to cold temperatures for a long period of time. Flesh bruising can occur in transit or as a result of compression caused by excessive handling. Unfortunately there is no way to detect either flesh discoloration or flesh bruising by looking at the avocado's exterior. Damaged areas or spots can be removed by cutting them out.

Purchasing or Selling Avocados

Growing Avocados

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